Thermal boundary resistance at thin ALD-grown high-k dielectric interfaces – Congrats Ethan Scott!

Congrats to Ethan Scott for his recent publication that experimentally determines the thickness regime in which the thermal boundary resistance at atomic layer deposited high-k dielectric interfaces dominates the total thermal resistance of the system.  In a collaboration with Dr. Sean King from Intel, we studied this with Al2O3, HfO2 and TiO2 ALD-grown thin films on silicon.

Scott, E.A., Gaskins, J.T., King, S.W., Hopkins, P.E., “Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of atomic layer deposited high-k dielectrics aluminum oxide, hafnium oxide, and titanium oxide thin films on silicon,” APL Materials 6, 058302 (2018). PDF.

Abstract

The need for increased control of layer thickness and uniformity as device dimen- sions shrink has spurred increased use of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for thin film growth. The ability to deposit high dielectric constant (high-k) films via ALD has allowed for their widespread use in a swath of optical, optoelectronic, and electronic devices, including integration into CMOS compatible platforms. As the thickness of these dielectric layers is reduced, the interfacial thermal resistance can dictate the overall thermal resistance of the material stack compared to the resistance due to the finite dielectric layer thickness. Time domain thermoreflectance is used to interrogate both the thermal conductivity and the thermal boundary resistance of aluminum oxide, hafnium oxide, and titanium oxide films on silicon. We calculate a representative design map of effective thermal resistances, including those of the dielectric layers and boundary resistances, as a function of dielectric layer thickness, which will be of great importance in predicting the thermal resistances of current and future devices.

We appreciate support from the Army Research Office (Grant No. W911NF-16-1-0320).

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